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On the release of 5 Taliban associates for one American soldier

Soldier released in exchange for five Taliban prisoners
NBC’s Kristen Welker reports on the release of American soldier Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl from Afghanistan in exchange for five Taliban prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.
  • he 5 Afghans released were chosen by the Taliban. I am glad he is released and survived, but I hope he appreciates the fact that five men were released who will likely make their way back to Afghanistan and wage war against the state of Afghanistan and the people of Afghanistan and cost and liberties the lives of Afghans just as worthy of those rights at Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.
    Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in US hands after five years as a Taliban prisoner of war. Officials say they were able to trade him for five Afghans the US was holding in Guantanamo Bay.
     
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      ABel AShes ABel AShes The 5 Afghans released were chosen by the Taliban. I am glad he is released and survived, but I hope he appreciates the fact that five men were released who will likely make their way back to Afghanistan and wage war against the state of Afghanistan and the people of Afghanistan and cost and liberties the lives of Afghans just as worthy of those rights at Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.
      1 hr · Like

      James Outlaw No I’m sure he doesn’t give a dam about what it took to get him free. That’s how it works buddy, nothing new. Also they will be waging war against our servicemen too.
      1 hr · Edited · Like

      Clave Fuller 5 afghan prisoners is not enough to repay him of what he did for your country. think of that
      10 mins · Like

      ABel AShes What did he do for my country? He might be charged with going AWOL for leaving base unauthorized which led to his being kidnapped. I agree with getting him released. I hope the 5 men released will be kept track of by someone other than Qatar. I just think that the lives and liberties of Afghans matter as much as the lives of Americans and it is disturbing that 5 men chosen by the Taliban from all possible prisoners are the ones released to Qatar and will be free to travel in one year’s time…back to Afghanistan even if illegally across the border from Pakistan. These men were not chosen because they were innocent but because they were guilty. I doubt the Taliban would chose 5 nobodies either. These men were chosen because they are important to the Taliban’s cause of re-enslaving Afghanistan under the most brutal form of sharia and continuing jihad against infidels and apostates including US troops.
      1 min · Like

      ABel AShes What he went through was horrific and it is equally horrific when it happens to a man or woman or child who is not a soldier or an American.

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    ABel AShes These 5 were chosen by Taliban leadership by name.
    7 hours ago · Like · 1
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    ABel AShes Yes some innocent people have been locked up at Guantanamo and some have been released and some are still being held and some have committed suicide or attempted to do so. Others were thought to be innocent and released and caught later involved with groups such as Al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula. The primary reason so many innocent men wound up in Guantanamo was a very stupid program after the initial invasion of Afghanistan in which Afghans could receive monetary reward for turning in members of the Taliban. Under such a program I wouldn’t be surprised if Taliban turned in anti-Taliban as Taliban to receive money to support the Taliban.
    7 hours ago · Edited · Like · 1
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    ABel AShes The Taliban is not involved in the business of securing the release of innocent people. If these 5 men were “innocent” by what you or I would mean by that, they would be seen as “guilty” in the minds of the Taliban.
    7 hours ago · Like · 1
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    ABel AShes I think they should have been put on trial a long time ago. I think the primary reason for the “indefinite detentions” is intelligence gathering. Many of those being held were marginal players in the networks of Al Qaeda and the Taliban but had inside information. I seriously doubt the five chosen for release by the Taliban out of all of the prisoners were marginal players in terrorism though.I also doubt the Obama Administration and the NSA and CIA have not thought of ways to keep track of these five men in the coming years, especially after their travel ban is lifted and they are free to leave Qatar. I guarantee their phone, internet, travel, and banking will be monitored.
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    ABel AShes http://en.wikipedia.org/…/List_of_Guantanamo_Bay_detainees

    en.wikipedia.org

    This list of Guantánamo detainees is compiled from various sources and is incomplete. It lists the known identities of detainees at the Guantanamo Bay detainment camp in Cuba. In official documents, the US Department of Defense (DoD) continues to make intermittent efforts to redact detainee’s names,…
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    ABel AShes http://en.wikipedia.org/…/Lists_of_former_Guantanamo…

    en.wikipedia.org

    In 2004, the US government claimed that newly released captives from Guantanamo Bay detainment camp “returned to the battlefield”.[1] Guantanamo Bay detainment camp is a joint military prison and interrogation camp under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO) which has occupied a p…
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    ABel AShes There are some who have been “cleared for release” for years and are still locked up and some who were released even though we knew they were guilty only to be arrested or killed later along with other “high value targets”. There is a lot more strategy to what is happening than we are allowed to know about.
    7 hours ago · Like · 1
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    ABel AShes Names of Guantanamo captives who are alleged to have “returned to the battlefield”
    ID Name Notes
    363 Maulvi Abdul Ghaffar AKA Shai Jahn Ghafoor

    Had been a senior Taliban military leader prior to capture.
    Allegedly captured in Afghanistan in December 2001, was one of the twenty-three prisoners released from Camp Delta in late January 2004. After his release, he joined the remnants of the Taliban and was killed in a gunfight on September 26, 2004.[1][1][15][16][17][18]
    The official list of Guantanamo captives included two men with the same name, who remained in custody years after Maulvi Abdul Ghaffar had been reported to have been released, and killed in combat.[6]
    92 Abdullah Mehsud
    Reportedly captured in Afghanistan in December 2001 after surrendering to Abdul Rashid Dostum.
    That he was ever been captured, and sent to Guantanamo has been challenged.[5]
    Allegedly masterminded the kidnapping of two Chinese engineers in Pakistan’s South Waziristan region.
    Allegedly returning to his position as an Al-Qaeda field commander.[16] One of the Chinese engineers died during a rescue mission, the other was rescued.[2]
    Mehsud also claimed responsibility for the bombing at Islamabad’s Marriott Hotel in October 2004. The blast injured seven people, including a U.S. diplomat, two Italians and the Pakistani prime minister’s chief security officer. Mehsud was subsequently reported to have been killed in combat.
    203 Ravil Shafeyavich Gumarov
    Reported to have had military training in Chechnya.[19]
    Convicted of bombing a natural gas pipeline on May 9, 2006.[20]
    Sentenced to 13 years.[21]
    69 Khaatamul Anbiya bin Daleel ul Khyayraat aka “Donkey Master”
    Was known for putting severed donkey heads on his victims.[22]
    294 Mohammed Bin Ahmad Mizouz
    One of the first 200 captives to be repatriated.[23][24]
    Reported seeing guards urinate on the Koran.[24]
    Reported being tortured while in US custody, reported that all the techniques used in Abu Ghraib were first used on captives like him in Bagram.[24]
    Convicted in September 2007 of recruiting fighters to send to Iraq.[21]
    297 Ibrahim Shafir Sen
    Sued Donald Rumsfeld upon his release.[25]
    Ibrahim Shafir Sen was transferred to Turkey in November 2003.[21] In January 2008, Sen was arrested in Van, Turkey, and charged as the leader of an active al-Qaida cell.
    367 Mohammed Yusif Yaqub
    aka
    Mullah Shahzada
    Reports of the release, return to the battlefield, and subsequent death in combat of Mullah Shahzada, while reported in the press, is always attributed to unnamed insiders.[26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][28][32]
    The official list of Guantanamo captives included a man the same name, Haji Shahzada who remained in custody years after the stories that Mullah Shahzada had been reported to have been released, and killed in combat. Haji Shahzada was one of the 38 captives whose Combatant Status Review Tribunal determined they had not been an enemy combatant in the first place.
    On Monday, May 14, 2007, Pentagon officials, for the first time, tied the reports that “Mullah Shahzada” had returned to the battlefield to the name of one of the captives on the official list of Guantanamo captives, Mohammed Yusif Yaqub.[8] According to Reuters summary of their testimony:
    “Released May 8, 2003, he assumed control of Taliban operations in Southern Afghanistan and died fighting U.S. forces on May 7, 2004.”
    587 Ibrahim Bin Shakaran
    The Defense Intelligence Agency asserted Ibrahim Bin Shakaran had “returned to terrorism”. The DIA reported:

    In September 2007 he was convicted in a Moroccan court for recruiting fighters for Al Qaida in Iraq in 2005.[21]
    Allegedly he was working to create an al Qaida in the Lands of the Maghreb.[21]
    Allegedly he was coordinating “sleeper cells” to go for training and return to Morocco.[21]
    930 Mohammed Ismail
    First identified as a former captive who had returned to the battlefield in Testimony before Congress on Monday May 14, 2007.[8] According to Reuters summary of their testimony:
    “Released from Guantanamo in early 2004, he was recaptured four months later in May while participating in an attack on U.S. forces near Kandahar. When captured, Ismail carried a letter confirming his status as a Taliban member in good standing.”
    582 Abdul Rahman Noor
    First identified as a former captive who had returned to the battlefield in Testimony before Congress on Monday May 14, 2007.[8] According to Reuters summary of their testimony:
    “Released in July 2003, he has since participated in fighting against U.S. forces near Kandahar. After his release, he was identified as the man described in an October 7, 2001, interview with Al Jazeera television as the “deputy defense minister of the Taliban.”
    633 Mohammed Nayim Farouq
    First identified as a former captive who had returned to the battlefield in Testimony before Congress on Monday, May 14, 2007.[8] According to Reuters summary of their testimony:
    Released from U.S. custody in July 2003, he quickly renewed his association with Taliban and al Qaeda members and has since become “reinvolved in anti-coalition militant activity.”
    930 Mohammed Ismail Agha
    Reports have circulated that one of the three children who was held for a year and a half, in Camp Iguana, and released on January 28, 2004, was subsequently captured, or subsequently killed in combat — accounts vary.[28]
    As with “Mullah Shahzada” this information is attributed to unnamed insiders.
    Accounts of when he was captured, or killed, vary.
    Oliver North claimed that the released child was “Mullah Shahzada”.[32] North claimed that “Mullah Shahzada” was killed in combat weeks after his release. Mullah is an honorary title, meaning “educated man”. However the only schooling the three children held in Camp Iguana ever received was the lessons they received at the camp.[34][35][36] North’s account that a released child from Camp Iguana was killed in combat, weeks after his release, is at odds with the accounts of the journalists who interviewed the children during the months following their release.

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    ABel AShes Badrzaman Badr[11] Afghanistan — A writer with a masters degree in English literature. At the time of his detention he was already imprisoned in Afghanistan for writing satirical articles that lampooned both the U.S. and the Taliban. [3]
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    ABel AShes http://jamesrupert.wordpress.com/…/brothers-held-three…/

    jamesrupert.wordpress.com

    As America scoured Muslim Asia for Al-Qaida in 2001, Pakistan’s spy agency arrested Badr Zaman and his brother over a satirical column they had written about President Bill Clinton. Pakistan handed…
  • ABel AShes
     

 

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2 thoughts on “On the release of 5 Taliban associates for one American soldier

  1. One issue that several people, including those who support the Democrat party, are wondering about is if President Obama can bypass Congress in getting these Guantanamo detainees released, why can’t he do the same for those detainees being held without charges?

    • I don’t think it’s a matter of “can’t” so much as “not sure if he should”. Many of those who were thought to be innocent have been released only to make front page news a few months later for being involved in major terrorist activities including bombings. Another issue, and I suspect this is the primary reason for the lengthy detentions and the avoidance of putting many of the detainees on trial, is that many of them are low level, but were involved enough to have inside information. There may not be enough evidence for a conviction, but that is not why they are being held. They are being held as sources of intelligence. Several have been released. There was a man arrested by ISI and turned in to the US for supposedly threatening to kill former President Clinton. The reality was that he was a satirical cartoonist who opposed Al Qaeda and the Taliban and was very critical of the Pakistani government and ISI. He made a cartoon making a joke about Bill Clinton and the ISI lied to get the guy sent to Guantanamo. He was there for 3 years if I remember correctly and finally released, not by executive order, but by the military I believe.

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